Inside Mustard, Atria Mall-Worli |All the Deets

By Sama Ankolkar July 6, 2018
Lovin' The Interiors At Mustard, Atria Mall

Making its entry into a bustling Mumbai from its quaint Goan bungalow, Mustard seems to be well settled on the ground floor of Atria Mall in Worli. The restaurant carries with it the charm of a Portuguese heritage home with its high ceilings, ornate chandeliers, wooden tables and flowery upholstery. Its open pink French windows provide ample natural light, making this scenario more picturesque than it already is. The menu doesn’t shy away from bold flavours of the Bengali and French cuisine that balance the tranquil ambience.

Interiors At Mustard, Atria Mall-Worli

Interiors At Mustard, Atria Mall-Worli. Image Source

The Bengali and French centric menu comes together through one common ingredient; mustard. However, it must be pointed out the this hasn’t been overly abused and one can enjoy the pungency of this at his or her own pace.

The Bengali affair has been curated by Pritha Sen, a food writer and consulting chef with a vast depth of knowledge on the both French and Bengali cuisine. Sen’s style of cooking has been inspired by her experiences in rustic kitchens in Bengal with her main aim being to bring the more non-conventional dishes from Bengali homes to the forefront of India’s food scene.

To start off, we sampled the Bengali Mezze Plattewhich showcased the Baqarkhani Roti (a tandoor baked bread), the absolutely delicious Palong Sager Bhorto (steamed spinach blended with fried garlic), the smoky Chhana Makha (smoked cottage cheese pate), the moist Loittya Maacher Jhuri (Bombay duck pate) and a flavourful Shrimp Pate.

Bengali Mezze Platter

Bengali Mezze Platter

Having been quite impressed with the mezze platter, I also sampled the Khoi-er-Bora which was a fritter made of popped rice, grated coconut and ginger juice. I found this to be slightly dry but once had with the kasundi, a traditional Bengali mustard, I enjoyed the dish much more. Pritha’s recommendation of the Mochar Guley Kebabs won me over. She claimed that it was one of the least known and almost forgotten dishes in the Bengali culture and I must admit that she has revived this dish with magic and ease. The kebab was soft and beautifully spiced making it one dish I would definitely come back for.My next dish was the Til-Tel Kathi, where I was blown away by charred black sesame pork cubes served with juicy bits of chopped pineapple. I polished off the entire place on my own!

For my main, I tried the Palong Chhanar Kofta (moist cottage cheese balls encased in spinach) with rice, a rich dal and shukto which was a bitter gourd paste along with some chunks of bittergourd in it. This dish was simple yet delightful and highlighted the chef’s desire of wanting to serve home-style cuisine in a more upscale setting.

The French menu which is curated by Gregory Bazire was just as enjoyable as the Bengali. The idea was to curate traditional dishes and twisted classics influenced from France. To start, I sampled a Piscaladire which was an onion tart; a puff tart stuffed with onions, confit red peppers and black olives. Each ingredient added its own flavour to the light and fluffy pastry and the savoury tart was demolished quite quickly.

Piscaladire

Piscaladire

I enjoyed the Tartine A La Provencale, which was an open tartine. Smoked aubergine with artichokes, grilled zucchini and goat cheese crumble sat on a toasted rosemary focaccia and would make a great option for a Parisian inspired lunch or snack. The smokiness was not overpowering and the flavours were not lost in the grilling of the vegetables, which I find happens very often in these kinds of dishes.

I also tried the Croquettes De Polenta Au Fromage which were cheesy polenta croquettes. These were crunchy and generously stuffed with gruyere, served with a mild porcini ragout and aioli. I found that the ragout and aioli could have been stronger to balance the blandness of the polenta and gruyere combination.

Croquettes De Polenta Au Fromage

Croquettes De Polenta Au Fromage

I enjoyed the Salad De Bettraves Roties which was a roasted beetroot salad which featured succulent beetroot cubes, pickled onions, crushed pepper and goat’s cheese. I loved the fresh, bold flavours and was transported to a Mediterranean state of mind. Next up was the Roasted Chicken Wings with Honey Mustard and Balsamic which tasted exactly how I expected it to. Though it wasn’t mind-blowing, it was very well cooked and balanced.

 Salad De Bettraves Roties

Salad De Bettraves Roties

You will find all your French classics in the main courses and while ordering, I was immediately drawn to the Lapin A La Cuillere (rabbit with rosemary jus). The pulled, slow-cooked, tender rabbit served on a bed of mashed potato and spinach was an absolute hit with me. The jus lent the perfect herbal notes to complement succulent meat which dominated the flavour of the entire dish. I would definitely go back to eat this dish again.

Lapin A La Cuillere

Lapin A La Cuillere

The dessert menu featured dishes from both cuisines. I chose to have the Aam Doi which was steamed mango curd, making me wistful for the bustling streets of Calcutta. I also had the Financier Aux Framboises which was a moist almond cake with a raspberry jam and a sphere of fresh raspberries. I found that this was the perfect end to my multicultural meal.

Aam Doi

Aam Doi

Mustard brings together two cultures rich with culinary history and does so in an unorthodox yet subtle manner. The food is not pretentious and focuses mainly on flavours and fresh ingredients rather than gimmicks and pretty plating. The food speaks for itself and with such a vast menu, I would recommend trying a bit of both the cuisines to truly appreciate the nuances of each. The menu consists of authentic flavours, beautiful ingredients and is a breath of fresh air in Mumbai, making it a place worth visiting.