Pitchfork Delivers Healthy Comfort Food | Indie Eats

By Mumbai Foodie July 27, 2017
Pitchfork delivers healthy and comfort food all over Bandra and beyond.

Zarine Watson has been a health and fitness professional with enough experience to dwarf most well-known names in the industry. The author, trainer, and entrepreneur has now put on a chef’s hat too, with Pitchfork, a nutrition-focused delivery service she runs with her son, Pearce. Fresh from stints at Indigo in Colaba and at a restaurant on a cruise, the young chef has partnered with his mother to help run Pitchfork smoothly.

We speak to Zarine to get a sense of their new business, which is delivering healthy orders to select customers in engihbourhoods around Bandra.

 

Zarine & Pearce Watson with the team at Pitchfork.

Zarine & Pearce Watson with the team at Pitchfork.

 

Give us a broad overview of Pitchfork. What made you start it?
I have spent 26 years in the Health and Fitness industry. When I hung up my boots from actively running my Fitness centre, the move to serving wholesome foods seemed like a natural progression. Having travelled extensively, I am well versed with global cuisine.

As fate would have it, the family had a chef in the wings. Pearce Watson (her son) armed with a Grande Diplome from Cordon Blue was happy to partner with me in this venture. Having done a stint with Indigo in Colaba and at a fine dining restaurant on a reputed cruise line, he was ready to start his own venture.

Pitchfork is now balanced between catering to clients looking for food rich in taste and nutrients as well as those looking for comfort foods.


As food entrepreneurs are you self-taught or do you have a background in hospitality?

I am self-taught, while Pearce and the rest of the crew are trained professionals from the industry.

 

Did you have any links to the hospitality industry before you started Pitchfork?
My years as a trainer made me synonymous with the hospitality business.

 

Penne Cajun Chicken à la Pitchfork.

Penne Cajun Chicken à la Pitchfork.

 

Take us through the best and worst thing about running an upcoming food business.
The thrill of creating and serving food which is appreciated for taste and nutritional content is always a high. It is a competitive and an aggressive industry that calls for vigilance, innovation and skill on a
daily basis. The worst is the cruelly long days and nights to ensure smooth and efficient running. This is a business that requires nurturing forever.


What’s your favourite food to make?

Our salads and full meal bowls are my absolute favourites at Pitchfork. At home, there are some family favuorites concocted to suit our varied tastes.

Tell us about the strangest request you have ever received from a client!
So far we have had no strange requests to deal with, they have all been fairly normal.

 

From Cow To Bao at Pitchfork includes spicy paneer bhurji topped with crispy sev and schezwan mayo.

From Cow To Bao at Pitchfork includes spicy paneer bhurji topped with crispy sev and schezwan mayo.


What sort of a space do you operate out of?

As Pitchfork is a delivery only outlet, we operate from a very well equipped central kitchen in Bandra.
Where do you get your ingredients from?
Our ingredients are sourced locally as well as imported. We cook fresh and in small batches to maintain freshness as well as to reduce needless waste, which is common in the industry. We choose our vendors with care to be able to deliver quality meals to our customers.

 

What’s product defines Pitchfork the most?
Our meals in a bowl come with a balanced ratio of proteins, grains, and vegetables. Our salads pack a punch too.


Towards who have you targeted Pitchfork?

To everyone looking to eat wholesome food, high on taste and quality but importantly with a few items that also appeal to the times when all we want is some comfort food. For instance our sandwiches are served with a garden salad instead of fries, our multigrain homemade bread is rich in fibre, and therefore a healthier option.


What’s your favourite dish from the menu at Pitchfork?

The Salmon Couscous bowl.